Web Developer Jargon You Should Know

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October 6, 2021

Reviewed by Brian Nichols
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Just entering the tech world and wondering what web developer jargon you should know? Even for established tech professionals, mastering web development terminology can take some time. Web developers regularly use terms such as 301 redirect, data structure, and propagation. Knowing web developer jargon can help you better navigate the tech world when just starting out.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that over 2 million professionals worked as software developers, web developers, quality assurance analysts and testers, and digital designers in 2020. All of these professionals use technical jargon in their daily work.

Web developers and professionals in similar roles must communicate with clients and colleagues in the process of creating and maintaining websites. Get to know the terms used in web development to ensure that you can communicate with your team. Below, you can find some of the most commonly used web developer jargon.

Glossary of Web Development Terms

In the tech industry, professionals use the web development terms listed below on a daily basis.

Frequently Asked Questions About Web Developer Jargon

What is a slider? true

Developers refer to slideshows on websites as sliders. Developers may use them to call attention to important content and save space. Sliders typically display products or photos in a rotating galley on the homepage. Visitors can interact with sliders and toggle to different images to navigate a website.

How much overlap does web development have with web design? true

Web developers handle the performance and functionality of a website. They write, edit, and test the code that allows a website to work.

Web designers work on the appearance of a website. Designers choose fronts, colors, and create storyboards and wireframes. They may also handle the user interface and user experience design. The two occupations overlap in some ways, especially among front-end web developers who write the code that determines how a website looks.

Do I need to understand SEO terminology as a web developer? true

Yes. Web developers should understand the basics of SEO to optimize a website and be able to communicate with clients. The importance of SEO depends on the company. Not every business relies on web traffic from search engines.

Reviewed by:

Born and raised in upstate New York, Brian Nichols began his IT education through a vocational high school where he focused on computer science, IT fundamentals, and networking. Brian then went to his local community college, where he received his associate of science in computer information science. He then received his bachelor of science in applied networking and system administration from a private college. Brian now lives in Kansas City, where he works full-time as a DevOps engineer. Brian is also a part-time instructor in cybersecurity. He's passionate about cybersecurity and helping students succeed.

Brian Nichols is a paid member of the Red Ventures Education freelance review network.

Find out how to become a web developer via a coding bootcamp and learn more about the job outlook for web developers. What's the difference between web development vs. software engineering? Read about how to choose between these two professions. These are the top 10 most important programming languages to learn. Read on to see which one you should learn first to launch your tech career.

BestColleges.com is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site.

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