Master’s in Educational Psychology Program Guide

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By James Mielke

Published on August 20, 2021

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A 2019 study published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology reveals that between 2005 and 2017, the rate of adolescent depression rose by a staggering 52%. And as COVID-19 potentially exacerbates mental health issues for young people, these issues could transfer to the classroom.

As a result, the value of educational psychology expertise, along with other mental health resources, can help cultivate safe and effective educational environments. Educational psychology students learn best practices in research, diagnostic, and teaching methods.

Read on to learn more about how a master's degree in educational psychology program can advance your career.

Should I Get a Master's in Educational Psychology?

Earning an online master's degree in educational psychology leads to specialized knowledge, enhanced career options, and higher pay. Graduates gain observational, research, and diagnostic skills widely transferable to careers in education and psychology.

Graduates gain observational, research, and diagnostic skills widely transferable to careers in education and psychology.

These programs generally require 30-36 credits, and most learners graduate in 18-24 months. Most programs require a one-semester or yearlong practicum in an educational setting.

In addition to developing a specialized skill set, educational psychology grads can earn state licensure to work as school psychologists or counselors. This degree can also lead to doctoral programs, academic research, and professional certifications.

Find the best online master's in educational psychology programs.

What Will I Learn in an Educational Psychology Master's Program?

Over the course of 30-36 credits and about two years, educational psychology master's students explore the fundamental theoretical and practical skills needed to conduct research, identify educational strategies, and create constructive learning environments.

Typical coursework for a master's degree in educational psychology includes introduction to educational psychology, self-regulation and motivation, and qualitative design and analysis. Students can often choose from concentrations like adult education, scholarly research, and applied behavioral analysis.

Many programs require students to complete a practicum in an educational environment. Upon graduating, students can pursue education and psychology doctoral programs.

Concentrations

Learning and Assessment
This concentration helps learners develop the educational assessment and evaluation skills essential to the learning process. Students tackle courses like evaluation of classroom learning, statistical methods in education, and advanced educational psychology.
Applied Behavior Analysis
Preparing degree-seekers for careers as board-certified behavior analysts, this concentration focuses on evidence-based practices that influence behavioral assessments. Common coursework includes functional behavioral assessment, professional ethics in behavior analysis, and physical bases of behavior.
School Psychology
In this concentration, learners prepare for careers as school psychologists. Students learn assessment, consultation, and intervention skills through courses like functional behavior assessment, social foundations of behavior, and behavioral principles of learning.
Gifted and Talented
This concentration focuses on program development, creative thinking, and gifted learners' emotional and social needs. Common courses include introduction to gifted and talented students, identification and evaluation of talented students, and models and strategies for gifted learners.

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How to Get Into an Educational Psychology Master's Program

All educational psychology master's programs require a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university. Many programs also require a 3.0 minimum undergraduate GPA. Some programs offer conditional admission for applicants who do not meet this GPA threshold.

Additional requirements often include official academic transcripts, letters of recommendation, a resume, and a personal essay.

Read Our Guide to Graduate Admissions.

What Can I Do With a Master's in Educational Psychology?

Graduates with a master's degree in educational psychology can pursue various careers in both in and out of traditional educational environments. Whether degree-holders embark on careers in research, private practice, or public schools, this advanced degree can open career doors and increase earning potential.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), general psychologists earn a median annual salary of $82,180. Keep in mind that these positions sometimes require a doctoral degree and a license. Additionally, instructional coordinators earn a median annual salary of $66,970, with the BLS projecting 6% job growth for these professionals between 2019 and 2029.

Popular Career Paths

Popular Continuing Education Paths

How Much Money Can I Make With a Master's in Educational Psychology?

According to the BLS, special education teachers earn a median salary of $61,420 per year. Social workers earn a median annual salary of $51,760, and the BLS projects 13% job growth for these professionals between 2019 and 2029. Keep in mind that salary potential depends on location, role, and experience.

Frequently Asked Questions About Master's in Educational Psychology Programs

What is educational psychology? true

Educational psychology is the scientific study concerning human learning. This overarching field encompasses subfields like adult education, applied behavioral analysis, and school psychology.

How much does it cost to get a master's in educational psychology? true

The cost of a master's degree in educational psychology varies between programs. Public schools are usually less expensive, and financial aid opportunities like scholarships, grants, and work-study programs can help offset the cost of this degree. Programs at state universities often cost around $25,000.

Is a master's in educational psychology worth it? true

Earning a master's degree in educational psychology requires a serious investment of time and money, but gaining an advanced degree can significantly boost career options and earning potential. Completing professional certifications can help augment the value of this degree.

How long does it take to get a master's in educational psychology? true

Most master's in educational psychology programs take 18-24 months to complete. Part-time students may need longer to graduate.

Are educational psychologists in high demand? true

The BLS projects significant job growth for many related jobs between 2019 and 2029. For example, during that period, the BLS projects 6% job growth for instructional coordinators and 13% job growth for social workers.

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