No matter where you live, voting in general, primary, and state elections is one of the great privileges of American citizenship.

How to Register to Vote in All 50 States

No matter where you live, voting in general, primary, and state elections is one of the great privileges of American citizenship — but you can’t vote if you aren’t registered. As a college student, you play a vital role in the country’s democratic process, and there are lots of high-profile issues in the 2016 election that directly affect college students. Most states require you to officially register to vote before you can cast your ballot on election day. However, the requirements, eligibility standards and even the way you register vary significantly from state to state. And if you fail to follow the guidelines in your state, may be disallowed from voting in key contests, such as presidential elections, state primaries or referendums. This page is designed to explain the official rules and regulations for voter registration in all 50 states, as well as the District of Columbia.

For more information, simply select from the drop-down menu or click on the interactive map below.

Select your state for registration information

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Disclaimer: BestColleges.com is not affiliated with any political parties, and none of our staff members are licensed to practice law or make legal recommendations. The information contained on this page is meant to be used as a general guide and should not be a substitution for consulting with government and state election officials.