When Do AP Scores Come Out?

AP exams can earn you college credit before you graduate high school. Learn more about when AP test scores are released and where to see AP scores.

portrait of Whitney Sandoval
by Whitney Sandoval

Published on April 4, 2022 · Updated on April 5, 2022

Edited by Hannah Muniz
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When Do AP Scores Come Out?


Many high schools offer Advanced Placement (AP) courses and exams. These upper-level classes prepare students for college through a rigorous curriculum. AP exams, meanwhile, test what you've learned in class and can even help you earn college credit.

All high school students, regardless of whether they're taking an AP course, have the option of signing up for and taking AP exams. These tests cover an array of subjects. Popular AP exams include AP English Language and Composition, AP Calculus AB, and AP U.S. History.

A 3 is considered a passing score, with most colleges awarding credit for a 3, 4, or 5. But when do AP scores come out? And how can you find them?

When Are AP Scores Released?

AP scores are typically released in July, or about two months after AP exams, which take place in May each year.

This year's AP exams will be administered over a two-week period from May 2-13, 2022. Retakes for those who missed AP exams or had scheduling conflicts will take place May 17-20, 2022. You can find your specific AP exam testing date here.

Regardless of which tests you take, all students must wait a couple months before finding out how they did on their AP exams. The exact AP score release dates for 2022 have not yet been announced.

In past years, AP scores were released at 7 a.m. EDT. That said, you may find yourself refreshing your College Board page quite a bit. Generally, scores have been rolled out over several days by geographic region, with students in certain states getting access before others.

Why Do AP Scores Take So Long?

Although most AP exams include multiple choice, many also include free-response questions, and these can take time to grade. Each year, AP readers — typically high school teachers and college professors — get together to read and score students' free responses.

Beginning in early June, AP readers gather across the U.S. and begin the process of reading through and scoring free-response essays. Although AP readers may score from home as well, there are specific scoring windows for each AP exam.

Where Do You Go to View AP Scores?

Once your AP scores are available, you can view them online. You must log in to your My AP account through the College Board website. Once logged in, you should be able to access your AP scores on your dashboard.

Your AP score report will include the year you took the exam, the name of the exam, and a final score of 1-5. As a reminder, a 3 is a passing score, and most colleges require at least a 3 to award credit.

Note that you'll get no additional information on your score report, such as breakdowns for multiple-choice and free-response questions.

If you'd like a paper copy of your AP scores, you can download an unofficial PDF. This PDF should include all the AP tests you've taken. Although having a hard copy of your report can be good for your records, know that you usually can't submit unofficial scores to colleges.

Frequently Asked Questions About Getting AP Scores

Can you get early AP scores? true

Unfortunately, you cannot get early access to your AP scores. Although many websites claim to help you get early access to AP scores, these are scams. Only the official College Board website can disclose your AP results.

Some AP test-takers claim to have found a small hack. Since AP test scores are usually rolled out by region, if you're able to change your login location to a state where AP scores have already been released, you may be able to get access a few hours earlier.

What if some of my AP scores aren't available? true

Generally, your AP scores should be available by mid-July. Sometimes, however, there can be delays. If you don't have your AP scores by Sept. 1, the College Board suggests contacting AP services for students for help.

Even if your AP score report is delayed, the colleges you selected to receive your AP scores should still automatically get your scores without issue.

Can teachers see your AP scores?

Teachers with access to AP score reports for educators can see your AP scores. According to the College Board, "Only teachers authorized through the AP Course Audit for the most current year for which AP score data has been released have access to their students' exam scores online."

Why is my AP score delayed?

There are a few reasons why your AP scores may get delayed. If your test was taken at a later testing date, you could experience a delay with receiving your AP score report. Occasionally, shipping delays occur, causing materials to arrive late and thus scores to be delayed.

You may also experience delayed AP scores if there is an error on any of your paperwork or if the College Board needs more time to verify your records. It's best to stay patient, but feel free to contact the College Board if you don't receive your scores by Sept. 1.

Feature Image: JGalione / E+ / Getty Images

Learn how to prepare for your AP exams and discover some useful study tips that can help improve your test scores. We've ranked the 10 hardest AP classes and tests based on exam pass rates and scores. Learn what you should consider when selecting AP classes. Learn how to find the "easiest" AP classes, which have more flexible study requirements, and earn college credit through classes with high exam pass rates.

BestColleges.com is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site.

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