Today's human resources professionals destroy the status quo, use cutting-edge technology, and help unlock each employee's potential, according to Inc. Magazine. With these talents, they go on to become leaders within organizations and make key decisions. Students who want to affect change and solve problems may find that a human resources degree is the first step to a rewarding career.

This field can also bring financial success and job security. While there are many different levels of human resources professionals, those who advance to management have a median pay of more than $110,000. Jobs within this field have a projected job growth rate at or above the national average. Now is the time to earn a human resources degree.

While online programs may appeal to working professionals who want to switch careers, an on-campus human resources plan is ideal for traditional college students. Degree candidates who come straight from high school or junior college can immerse themselves in learning. On-campus students can take advantage of the networking opportunities these programs afford. By meeting face-to-face with classmates and professors, learners begin building professional connections before graduation. Students who make a particularly good impression on professors may benefit even more since these teachers often know experienced human resource managers and can serve as excellent references.

As graduation approaches, degree candidates can further leverage their on-campus status to find internships, and many higher learning institutions offer job placement assistance. Courses allow students to rub elbows with potential employers, gain real-world experience, boost their resumes, and gain college credit all at once. Graduates can then use each of those benefits to land their first full-time human resources job.

Courses cover a wide range of topics, including conflict resolution, employment law, workplace psychology, business ethics, and innovative recruiting. With these classes, students gain several skills that will carry them through successful careers. In pursuit of a human resources degree, students learn to communicate effectively. Degree candidates may also develop talents for recruiting effective workers and retaining them through great company cultures. Graduates further develop crisis intervention abilities.

Human resources careers exist at all levels, beginning with entry-level assistants and working up to advanced specialists and managers, who tend to earn higher salaries. This guide considers the aspects that make a state a good place for human resources professionals to work, and details those factors to help workers choose where to pursue their human resources career.

Human resources professionals cover different job duties depending on their career level, and they work in a variety of industries. This guide mentions a few of the key industries for these professionals that provide consistent opportunities across most states.

Methodology

Information was taken from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. This guide focuses primarily on career opportunities for human resource assistants, human resource specialists, and human resource managers, and pays particular attention to states that show up frequently across data points for each career.

Rank School Description Toggle
1 California

Human resources professions often offer great potential for assistants, specialists, and managers across the country. In California, human resource managers experience the highest employment level with 17,160 managers employed in the state. California also pays these professionals the fifth-highest salary for human resources professions nationwide, with an annual mean wage of $139,860. Human resource specialists in California experience the highest employment levels for the occupation, with 60,260 employees, and the fourth-highest salary, with an annual mean wage of $74,910.

In California, human resource assistants also enjoy the highest employment level in the country with 15,830 employees in the occupation. These professionals earn an annual mean wage of $43,810, which proves higher than the average annual wage of $39,480 for the country. The Los Angeles-Long Beach-Glendale, California Metropolitan Division reports the second-highest employment level for human resources assistants in a metropolitan area of the United States, with 4,170 employees.

2 Texas

Human resource managers direct, plan, and coordinate human resources activities and maintain an organization's staff. They often work with employee benefits, compensation, and training. Texas shows the fourth-highest employment level for human resources managers in the United States, with 7,090 employees in the occupation, earning an annual mean wage of $134,060. Human resource specialists in Texas experience the second-highest employment level for their occupation in the United States with 47,660 employees, bringing in an annual mean wage of $67,440.

Texas reports the second-highest employment level for human resources assistants in the United States, with 12,200 employees. These professionals earn an annual mean wage of $39,070. The Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas Metropolitan Division reports the fifth-highest employment level for the occupation in a metropolitan area with 2,800 employees.

3 New York

New York proves itself a great state for human resource professionals in all specializations. Human resource managers in New York earn remarkably high annual salaries, bringing home an annual mean wage of $144,310, in comparison with the national average salary of $110,120. New York reports the second-highest employment level for human resource managers, with 10,290 employees in the state. These professionals earn the fourth-highest salary in the country for their occupation.

Human resource specialists perform a variety of activities in the human resources area, often recruiting, interviewing, screening, and placing employees within a company. New York boasts the third-highest employment level for the occupation, with 35,260 employees. These professionals enjoy the second-highest salary for their occupation in the country, with an annual mean wage of $75,730. Many human resource professionals pursue careers as human resource assistants. New York reports the third-highest employment level for this occupation, with 10,790 employees in the state.

4 District of Columbia

Washington D.C. boasts many different opportunities for human resource professionals. Human resource managers in Washington D.C. experience the highest concentration for their occupation and the highest location quotient in the country, with 1,540 employees -- 2.7 times the national average concentration. Human resource managers in Washington D.C. enjoy the third-highest salaries in the country, earning an annual mean wage of $155,790.

Human resource specialists also experience their share of benefits in Washington D.C. They earn the highest pay in their occupation, bringing in an annual mean wage of $92,950 and they also experience the highest concentration of jobs and location quotients for their occupation, with 7,470 jobs -- 2.71 times the national average concentration. Human resource assistants experience top pay in Washington D.C., earning an annual mean wage of $53,390. Their annual nationwide mean wage was $39,480.

5 Florida

Florida has many attractive opportunities for human resource professionals, featuring the fifth-highest employment levels for human resource managers with 6,230 employees. These professionals earn an annual mean wage of $107,950. Human resource specialists in Florida experience the fourth-highest employment level for their occupation, with 32,310 jobs and an annual mean wage of $58,620.

Florida also proves a great state for human resource professionals to begin their careers, working as human resources assistants. Boasting the fourth-highest employment level for the occupation, Florida human resource assistants make up 7,340 jobs and earn an annual mean wage of $36,660. No matter where on the spectrum a human resources professional lands, Florida can provide high employment levels and great opportunities.

6 Illinois

Human resource professionals should consider a variety of factors when deciding where to base their career. First, they should identify where in their careers they fall: assistant, specialist, or manager.

Illinois boasts great opportunities for human resource professionals, making it an ideal state for entry-level individuals to base their careers. Human resources managers in the state experience the third-highest employment levels, with 9,560 jobs. These professionals earn an annual mean wage of $112,430. Additionally, Illinois provides the second-highest concentration of jobs for human resources managers -- 1.69 times the national average concentration.

7 Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania provides human resource professionals with several attractive employment opportunities. For professionals interested in working in a state with high employment levels, Pennsylvania proves an excellent choice. The state features the fifth-highest employment levels for human resources specialists.

Human resources specialists typically handle responsibilities like record keeping for employees, preparing reports, and handling work-related documentation. They also screen, recruit, interview, and place employees, and handle any work-related issues those employees face. In Pennsylvania, these professionals make up 23,670 of the state's jobs, and earn an annual mean wage of $66,980.

8 New Jersey

Human resources professionals should pay attention to various details when deciding in which state they want to base their career. First and foremost, they need to determine the human resources career in which they have interest, whether it be human resources assistant, human resources specialist, or human resources manager. From there, professionals can decide which elements of data seem most important to them, including salary, employment levels, and job concentration.

Professionals interested in a human resources manager position who want high salary opportunities should look to New Jersey for employment. New Jersey stands as the highest-paying state for human resources managers, who earn an annual mean wage of $162,540 -- much higher than the annual national mean wage for the occupation of $110,120. The state proves an excellent choice for human resources managers, who make up about 3,740 of the jobs in New Jersey.

9 Rhode Island

Human resource managers plan and coordinate activities in an organization. They link management to employees, oversee and plan employee benefit programs, carry out disciplinary procedures, manage issues, and oversee the recruitment, interviewing, and hiring process. These professionals enjoy the highest salary opportunities in the human resources field with an annual mean wage of $110,120 across the United States.

Rhode Island proves a great place for human resources managers to base their careers. The state features the second-highest pay for these professionals, boasting an annual mean wage of $156,790. With salary opportunities significantly higher in Rhode Island than in most of the United States, these professionals can benefit from basing their careers in this state.

10 Massachusetts

Massachusetts features a variety of attractive opportunities for human resources professionals across the spectrum. Typically, these professionals begin their careers as human resources assistants, and work their way to human resources specialist or manager positions. These professionals account for salary, job concentration, and employment levels when deciding where to build their careers.

Across the board, Massachusetts proves a great place for human resources professionals to base their careers. The state features the third-highest concentration of jobs for human resources managers with 5,660 jobs and an annual mean wage of $134,790. Massachusetts also boasts the third-highest pay for human resources specialists, and the fourth-highest pay for assistants. Human resource specialists in the state bring in an annual mean wage of $74,940, while human resource assistants enjoy an annual mean wage of $46,290.

11 Alaska

Human resource professionals can discover promising opportunities in just about any state, including Alaska. The average salary rates and employment levels for the country steadily report solid numbers that could benefit professionals. Some states offer better opportunities than others by way of salary, job concentration, and employment levels. Despite high numbers for the United States as a whole, professionals should consider employment in Alaska specifically, since it boasts so many great opportunities.

Human resource assistants in Alaska enjoy the second-highest pay for their occupation in the country, with an annual mean wage of $47,220. This exceeds the United States annual mean wage for the occupation, which stands at $39,480. Alaska also features the fifth-highest concentration of jobs for human resources assistants, with 430 jobs and a location quotient of 1.43, which is 1.43 times the national average concentration.

12 Connecticut

Covering a broad spectrum of career levels, human resources professionals enjoy many unique opportunities, depending on their career level and the state in which they work. Many professionals base their job searches on opportunities offered by specific states, to ensure they benefit as much as possible from their chosen path in human resources.

In Connecticut, human resource assistants enjoy the third-highest pay for their occupation, with an annual mean wage of $46,480. These professionals hold 1,280 jobs in the state, below average for the national employment concentration. Human resources managers also thrive in Connecticut with the fifth-highest employment concentration, boasting 2,380 jobs. These professionals earn an annual mean wage of $136,120.

13 Minnesota

Minnesota is a great state for human resources professionals to base their careers. These professionals cover a range of responsibilities, depending on their career level. Human resource assistants typically handle documentation including employee records to track things like contact information and salary data. Human resource managers, on the other hand, handle a much broader scope of responsibility. They oversee all functions of an organization and handle recruiting, interviewing, hiring, firing, and job placement.

Minnesota offers opportunities to both managers and assistants. Human resource managers in the state enjoy the fourth-highest employment concentration with 4,380 jobs, and an annual mean wage of $121,530. Human resource assistants experience the highest concentration of jobs for their occupation with 5,400 jobs, and an annual mean wage of $41,540. These professionals also experience twice the employment concentration of human resource assistants on the national level.

14 South Carolina

Human resource professionals should account for job concentration, employment levels, and salary data when deciding where to launch their careers. Some of these elements carry more weight than others, depending on each professional's specialization. When conducting their job search, professionals should keep in mind that each level of employment for human resources professionals carries different data in each state.

Many human resources professionals choose to base their job search on which areas hold high concentrations of jobs. These professionals enjoy looking for work in an area where an abundance of opportunity exists. South Carolina boasts the fourth-highest concentration of jobs for human resources assistants, with 2,850 jobs representing a concentration 1.5 times the national average. These professionals enjoy an annual mean wage of $35,640.

15 Virginia

For individuals interested in working with recruiting, interviewing, hiring, and job placement in a state with high job concentration, Virginia proves a great fit. Human resources jobs cover a broad spectrum. These professionals work across different levels including assistants, specialists, and managers, and they work in a variety of fields, each boasting its own unique salary opportunities and employment levels. When determining where to base their career, human resources professionals can access state-specific data relevant to their career of choice to decide whether a state proves a good fit for them or not.

One of the most common jobs for human resources professionals, human resources specialists, enjoy great employment opportunities in Virginia. Virginia boasts the second-highest concentration of jobs for the occupation, with 19,900 jobs -- 1.35 times the national average concentration. These professionals enjoy an annual mean wage of $74,390.

16 Hawaii

Professionals enjoy knowing that the state they work in provides a solid concentration of jobs in their field, and Hawai'i is one of those states. A high job concentration provides professionals with comfort regarding job security and chances for finding employment, so many professionals gravitate toward states with higher job concentrations.

Human resources assistants prove one of the most popular careers for human resources professionals, especially since they serve as entry-level human resource workers. Hawai'i features the third-highest concentration of jobs for human resource assistants, with 1,000 jobs representing a concentration 1.67 times the national average. These professionals earn an annual mean wage of $41,630 -- higher than the United States mean annual wage of $39,480.

17 Washington

Washington proves a great state for human resources specialists to work. The state features the third-highest concentration of jobs for the occupation with 15,980 jobs, representing a concentration 1.29 times higher than the national average. Human resources professionals interested in handling new employee orientations, conducting interviews, reviewing job duties with applicants and new hires, and contacting references during the hiring process to verify qualifications should consider a human resources specialist position. Many human resource specialists base their decisions regarding where to start their careers on job concentration data. These individuals enjoy states with higher job concentrations since they denote more job opportunities.

Human resource professionals in Washington enjoy an annual mean wage of $69,280, making the state a great option for professionals regarding salary, coming in higher than the annual mean wage for the rest of the United States: $60,350.

18 Maryland

As human resources assistants search for the best state for employment, they may consider high job placement rates, which indicate a higher chance of gaining employment than other comparable states. Maryland in particular features the second-highest concentration of jobs for human resource assistants, with 4,300 jobs representing a concentration 1.71 times higher than that of the national average. These professionals enjoy an annual mean wage of $43,870.

Responsible for compiling and maintaining personnel records, human resources assistants record various data for each employee. These assistants must keep track of employees' addresses, sales production, weekly earnings, absences, paid time off, and other career-related data pertinent to their employment with the organization in question. These professionals consider a variety of factors in their search for a state in which to pursue their careers, and many value job concentration above other factors.

19 Delaware

Delaware proves a great state for human resources professionals to look for employment. Human resources specialists assume responsibility for interviewing candidates, hiring them, and handling job placement. They experience the fourth-highest concentration of jobs for their occupation in Delaware, with 2,130 jobs and a location quotient of 1.24, indicating a concentration 1.24 times higher than the national average. These professionals enjoy an annual mean wage of $63,850.

Human resources specialists enjoy great opportunities for their occupation in Delaware, and should specifically look to the employment services industry if they want to work for the industry with the highest employment levels for their occupation. The employment services industry employs 87,190 of the country's human resources specialists, with an annual mean wage of $62,230. Employment services also boasts the highest job concentration levels, while industries utilizing the pipeline transportation of crude oil offer the highest salaries for human resources specialists.

20 Kentucky

Kentucky features plenty of opportunities for human resources professionals. In particular, human resources specialists in the Elizabethtown-Fort Knox, Kentucky metropolitan area experience the highest concentration of jobs in a metropolitan area for their occupation. This area boasts 890 jobs, with a staggering 4.24 location quotient. Professionals in this area earn an annual mean wage of $67,550.

Human resources assistants in Kentucky also experience the highest concentration of jobs in a metropolitan area for their occupation in Elizabethtown-Fort Knox, Kentucky with 410 jobs, marking an 8.16 location quotient. These human resources assistants earn an annual mean wage of $45,050.

21 West Virginia

West Virginia proves a great state for human resource specialists to work. The state features the second-highest concentration of jobs for a metropolitan area in the human resource specialist occupation, with 19,110 jobs and a location quotient of 1.95 in the Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, District of Columbia-Virginia-Maryland-West Virginia Metropolitan Division. Human resources specialists working in this area face a higher concentration of jobs than professionals in the rest of the state.

Human resource specialists experience the highest employment levels and concentration of jobs in the employment services industry. Other industries that come in with high numbers for these focus areas include management of companies and enterprises, office administrative services, and the federal executive branch. Each state reports its own unique data for human resources specialists, but these industries register throughout the country.

22 Ohio

In addition to noting which states offer the best working environments for human resources professionals, these professionals also look for which metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas boast high employment rates and job concentrations. Ohio represents one of the best states for human resources specialists, since nonmetropolitan areas in the state feature high numbers for a variety of data points.

The west northwestern Ohio nonmetropolitan area comes in as the nonmetropolitan area with the highest employment level for human resources specialists, with 1,010 jobs and a location quotient of 1.03. These professionals also earn an annual mean wage of $57,370. The north northeastern Ohio nonmetropolitan area serves as the nonmetropolitan area with the second-highest employment of human resources in the specialists in the country, offering an annual mean wage of $54,030.

23 Iowa

Many human resources professionals choose where to pursue their careers depending on which metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas afford the most attractive career opportunities. Focusing on this data helps professionals determine where within their chosen state they should seek employment.

The southeast Iowa nonmetropolitan area represents the nonmetropolitan area with the highest employment level for human resources managers. These professionals earn an annual mean wage of $101,200. Human resources managers prove the highest-paying career in the human resources field, and professionals interested in working specifically for the highest-paying industry should look for employment in monetary authorities.

24 Maine

Human resources professionals can enjoy a variety of attractive career opportunities across the scope of their career. Most begin their careers as human resource assistants, responsible for compiling and organizing personnel files and recording data for all employees. From there, they advance to human resource specialists and managers. Human resources specialists screen, recruit, interview, and place workers. Human resources managers coordinate the activities of an organization and often cover employee benefits and compensation.

Human resources managers often base their careers in Maine, which boasts high employment levels. Specifically, the Southwest Maine nonmetropolitan area offers the second-highest employment level for a nonmetropolitan area for the occupation, with 190 jobs and an annual mean wage of $96,840.

25 North Carolina

North Carolina proves a great place for human resources professionals to base their career. The Piedmont, North Carolina nonmetropolitan area features the second-highest employment level in a nonmetropolitan area for human resources assistants, with 370 jobs. These professionals earn an annual mean wage of $32,950.

Human resources assistants in North Carolina should look to general merchandise stores if they want to work in the industry with the highest employment levels for their occupation.

What Can I Do With a Bachelor's in Human Resources?

Human resources is a varied field with opportunities for many personality types. Natural leaders may gravitate toward compensation and benefits management. Those with strong logical skills may excel in management analysis, and naturally likable people can have a stable career in labor relations. Human resource specialists are often extroverts, curious, and interested in psychology. Training and development specialists must be able to give presentations. Most human resource professionals work in office settings. However, new technologies allow some to work from home. It's essential for these workers to relate to others and understand what drives people.

Compensation and Benefits Manager

Pay and benefits are vital parts of recruiting and retaining great talent. These managers ensure that employees get the compensation they deserve while keeping the company profitable. Because these professionals run whole systems within a business, employers often require a compensation manager to hold a human resources bachelor's degree.

Median Annual Salary: $119,120
Projected Growth Rate: 5%

Labor Relations Specialist

The hiring process often involves negotiations, navigating legal requirements, and signing contracts. These professionals work with talent to reach labor agreements. Because there are several legal and ethical considerations, many employers prefer applicants to have a bachelor's degree.

Median Annual Salary: $63,200
Projected Growth Rate: -8%

Training and Development Specialist

Human resource professionals hire and fire, but they also work with current employees. These specialists design training programs and approve outside education for employees. Like other human resources positions, these jobs typically require a bachelor's degree. Many graduates take on these positions straight out of college.

Median Annual Salary: $60,360
Projected Growth Rate: 11%

Icon - Person Management Analyst

Lower-level employees aren't the only people who need supervision in a business. Management analysts examine an organization's management and remedy inefficiencies and problems. This position can be entry-level, but most companies prefer professionals with at least a bachelor's degree.

Median Annual Salary: $82,450
Projected Growth Rate: 14%

Human Resource Specialist

These professionals recruit, interview, and hire new employees. They also help ensure that managers and others in the interview process follow procedure and the law. In most cases, human resource specialists must have a bachelor's degree.

Median Annual Salary: $60,350
Projected Growth Rate: 7%

Choosing a human resource management program requires time and careful consideration. First, prospective students should consider how much time each program will take to complete. While most bachelor's programs take about four years, some factors could change this. For example, some colleges offer accelerated courses that allow students to earn a human resources degree in three years. Learners who already have some college experience should consider whether their credits will transfer. If so, degree candidates with associate degrees can finish in as little as two years. However, some programs cater to working professionals who can only attend school part-time, which can extend a student's time in school.

Tuition is another important consideration. Students who must rely on loans may wish to choose public universities or other low-cost options. When calculating a school's expense, consider not only tuition rates, but also commuting, the number of credit hours needed, additional fees, and books. Online programs typically cost less than their on-campus counterparts. For in-person students, the school's location plays a significant role in the decision to attend. Learners should consider the area's employment opportunities, quality of living, and housing costs.

Human resources students should ensure that the chosen schools offer their desired specializations. Applicants can research each college's curriculum, concentrations, and courses to see if they will learn the skills they need. Accreditation should also factor heavily into a student's decision.

Programmatic Accreditation for Bachelor's in Human Resources Programs

There are two main types of accreditation: regional and national. Either of these accredits the institution on the whole, but not the program specifically. Regional accreditation tends to be more prestigious than national, and students can transfer credits from regionally accredited universities with more ease.

There is also programmatic accreditation. As the name implies, this credential applies only to the program in question. Many fields have their own programmatic accrediting organizations that set the standard for that subject. Because it is a sub-category of business studies, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) is the primary accrediting organization for human resources programs. Students should prioritize these degree plans over others because they are more respected and the credits are more likely to transfer. Accredited programs are also vetted for the best possible education in the subject, which lays a solid foundation for a successful career.

Applying for college can feel daunting, but some research and guidance makes the process seamless. There is no magic number of schools to which a student should apply. Instead, learners should carefully consider their needs and apply to programs that meet those requirements. Generally, it is smart to send applications to at least two schools just in case one does not work out. However, applicants may submit to any programs they wish to attend. Some students choose a safety school, which is one that they feel confident that they will get accepted to.

Acceptance rates and admissions requirements vary widely between institutions. According to U.S. News & World Report, online bachelor's programs have an average acceptance rate that is just 2.4% higher than their on-campus counterparts. Before students submit their applications, they should check deadlines and gather all necessary materials. Below are some of the common requirements for admissions.

Prerequisites

  • Minimum GPA: While the minimum varies, many colleges and universities require at least a 3.0 GPA. Many colleges allow students to make up for a lackluster GPA with high test scores.

Admission Materials

  • Application: Completing college applications can take several hours, especially when the application requires lengthy essays. Students can use CommonApp to quickly apply to several schools at once.
  • Transcripts: Transcripts from high school and any previous college courses help the institution verify an applicant's GPA and experience. Many high schools offer a few transcripts for free with a small fee for additional documents.
  • Recommendation Letters: Colleges generally ask for between two and four recommendation letters. These can come from high school counselors, teachers, professors, or managers.
  • Test Scores: Many higher learning institutions will accept scores from either the SAT or the ACT, whichever the student submits. Learners can choose which schools to send scores to when they take the test.
  • Application Fee: According to U.S. News & World Report, the average college application fee is $50. However, learners with financial hardship can often receive a waiver for this fee.

Each higher learning institution offers its students unique opportunities. Applicants should thoroughly research a program before applying to ensure that it meets their needs. Learners should consider each school's human resources concentrations and courses, program length, and potential licenses or certifications. Often, human resources is not its own major but is a concentration within the business or management programs.

Concentrations Offered for a Bachelor's Degree in Human Resources
Concentration Description Careers
Entrepreneurship This specialization includes courses on hiring and retaining talent for startup companies. Learners take classes in subjects such as innovation, venture capital, and new business strategies. Graduates can start their own human resource businesses or partner with innovators in other sectors. Business owner or human resources manager

Courses in a Bachelor's in Human Resources Program

Each school's program has its unique curriculum, but there are plenty of classes that most human resource majors can expect to take. Programs often require classes in employment law, recruiting staff, training employees, and compensation. Many school also require human resource management degree candidates to complete an internship.

Employment Law

One of the most important functions of a human resources professional is to ensure that the company abides by all applicable employment laws. Most college students who earn human resource degrees study this subject. Learners discover how to conduct interviews and hire staff legally.

Recruitment

Finding the right person to fill a position is often difficult. It requires knowledge of psychology, ethics, and legal practice. In recruitment classes, students learn about emerging technologies and algorithms that help companies find and keep top talent.

Organizational Training

While some training is job-specific, other learning opportunities benefit everyone in a company. In organizational training courses, students learn best practices for planning and executing both types of training. These courses prepare degree candidates to become training and development specialists.

Compensation and Benefits

Human resources professionals often manage payroll and benefits enrollment within an organization. Thus, classes that cover the types of compensation, laws and ethics regarding payment, and how to structure benefits are common.

Internship

Many courses in human resources programs focus on theory. Some programs require degree candidates to put their learning into action with an internship. Students often fulfill this requirement as they near graduation, which sets them up with a strong network when they look for entry-level jobs.

How Long Does It Take to Get a Bachelor's in Human Resources?

Like many bachelor's degrees, it takes about four years to earn an undergraduate degree in human resources. However, students may have different timeframes based on several factors. Those with associate degrees may already have the core course requirements finished. If these learners transfer to an institution that accepts their previous credits, it may take two years or fewer to earn a bachelor's. Students who have no previous college experience can graduate in fewer than four years if they attend full time, take summer courses, choose accelerated programs, or combine some of these strategies. However, many schools prevent students from taking more than full-time hours.

Those who must work full time or care for their family while in school may choose to attend part time. In this case, students may take longer than their peers with the same college experience starting out.

How Much is a Bachelor's in Human Resources?

Before applying for any human resources program, learners should investigate tuition and other educational costs. According to The College Board, a year of school at a public, in-state university costs students an average of $20,090. However, this is just a benchmark. The cost for any particular student varies widely. Studying at a university outside the student's state of residence can cost about $14,000 more per year. Private schools carry an average annual cost of $45,370. These estimations include room, board, fees, and tuition.

Studying online costs much less than attending an on-campus program because the book costs and fees are often less. Learners also save money by taking core classes such as college algebra, history, and composition at local two-year colleges. These public institutions cost an average of $11,580 per year. Degree candidates can also apply for scholarships and grants that cover these costs.

Another part of analyzing the cost of any college program is weighing the increase in earning potential. Human resource managers can make more than $100,000 per year on average. Most positions in the field require a bachelor's degree.

Certifications and Licenses a Bachelor's in Human Resources Prepares For

Associate Professional in Human Resources

This entry-level certification comes from the Human Resources Certification Institute (HRCI). The aPHR is the first human resources certification exclusively for professionals who are just beginning their career. The exam covers operations, employee relations, recruitment, and compensation. Candidates with this certification are suited for most entry-level positions.

Professional in Human Resources — International

This is the second level of certification from the HRCI, with an emphasis on international businesses. The PHRi credential demonstrates professional-level competency in global human resource standards. The exam includes questions about talent acquisition, administration, talent management and development, compensation, benefits, employee relations, risk management, and information management.

Senior Professional in Human Resources

The SPHR certification from the HRCI shows a professional's readiness to lead a human resources department. As such, 30% of the exam covers business management and strategy. Other topics include human resource development and workforce planning. The credential demonstrates the ability to solve high-level problems and see the big picture.

Global Professional in Human Resources

International businesses face unique challenges when it comes to hiring and managing talent. Professionals withthis prestigious HRCI certification are ready to lead human resources departments at global organizations. The exam primarily covers strategic management, talent and organizational development, and global talent acquisition.

SHRM Certified Professional

The Society for Human Resource Management provides accredited certifications for members who meet the qualifications and pass the exam. The SHRM-CP credential demonstrates a person's ability to perform human resources functions with professional proficiency. An applicant with an undergraduate human resources degree must have one year of experience before taking the exam.

HR.com

This website connects more than one million human resources professionals from around the world. Members can network, get feedback on ideas, and access online learning tools.

HR Crossing

HR Crossing is one of the industry's largest job boards. Students can find internships and entry-level positions or research their dream jobs.

Human Resources Today

This blog dives deep into trending human resources topics such as analytics, employee engagement, and onboarding. Students can sign up for the newsletter to receive relevant blogs through email.

HRReview

Most human resources professionals must study before passing the certification exams. HRReview is the source for all things certification. This includes online courses and practice exams. Professionals can access what they need to get their desired credentials.

Evil HR Lady

Before getting their feet wet, some students may wonder why human resources professionals do some of the things they do. Evil HR Lady is the blog that answers those questions.

Professional Organizations in Human Resources

Professional organizations often offer local groups and conferences in which professionals can grow their networks. Many advocate for their members in Congress in hopes of improving the profession. Recent graduates can use the job boards and career services these organizations provide. Some organizations also provide certification programs for qualified professionals.