University of Maryland to Cover Tuition for In-State, Pell Grant-Eligible Students

With the Terrapin Commitment, the university announced it will pay the remainder of tuition costs for eligible students after all other financial aid is exhausted.
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  • In-state, Pell-eligible students are automatically considered for the Terrapin Commitment program and do not need to fill out a separate application.
  • The annual $20 million for the program is the largest single-year investment in need-based scholarships in the university's history.
  • Eligible students for the 2022-2023 year will receive Terrapin Commitment confirmation by Nov. 4.

The University of Maryland, College Park (UMD) is the latest institution to announce it will cover full tuition and fees for qualifying in-state students.

The university this week announced a $20 million annual investment in need-based financial aid for full-time, Pell Grant-eligible students starting in 2023.

Dubbed the Terrapin Commitment, the program represents the largest single-year investment in need-based scholarships in the university's history.

Eligible students who filled out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for 2022-2023 are automatically considered for the Terrapin Commitment. Under the program, the university will cover the remainder of tuition and fees after all scholarships, grants, and expected family contributions have been exhausted.

“UMD is the latest institution to announce adjustments in their financial aid formulations aimed at breaking down financial barriers to higher education.”
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"Every Maryland student deserves an equal opportunity to attend the state's flagship university," UMD President Darryll J. Pines said in a statement, "and the Terrapin Commitment program is one more measure we are taking to ensure that a University of Maryland education is affordable to all residents of our state."

Students eligible for aid in the 2022-2023 academic year can expect to be notified of Terrapin Commitment funding via email by Nov. 4, the university said.

UMD is the latest institution to announce adjustments in their financial aid formulations aimed at breaking down financial barriers to higher education.

In New England, a trio of colleges are dropping tuition costs to make higher education more accessible and reflect the true cost of school after considering financial aid.

In Virginia, William & Mary last month revealed a similar plan to cover tuition and fees for in-state, Pell-eligible students.

Michigan, meanwhile, is granting in-state students up to $5,500 per year to enroll in the state's public and private schools. And New Mexico this year expanded its existing college tuition fund to all students and degree types attending an in-state public or tribal college and university.

Even Princeton University is changing its financial aid policies. Earlier this year, it promised free education for students from families making under $100,000 a year.