Suicide Prevention Resources for College Students

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By Staff Writers

Reviewed by Megan Pietrucha, Psy.D.

Published on September 8, 2021

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In 2019, suicide was the second-leading cause of death for teenagers and young adults aged 15-24 in the U.S. While the causes of suicides and suicide attempts in this group vary, research shows that the stress, confusion, and self-doubt that often accompany adolescence may contribute to the risk of suicide among young people.

For college students in particular, academic pressures, mental health conditions like depression and anxiety, and alcohol and drug misuse can further increase this risk.

Experts recommend raising awareness of the risk of suicide among college students, as well as promoting resources like suicide hotlines and online emergency chat services. College students can and should take advantage of mental health services available on campus, such as those offered through the campus counseling center and peer-to-peer counseling.

Below is a list of general suicide prevention resources that both students and those supporting students can use.

Emergency Hotlines and Chat Centers

National Mental Health Organizations and Institutes

Support Services for Students With Mental Health Conditions

Volunteer Opportunities and Suicide Prevention Education

  • Befrienders Worldwide

    This organization offers tools and resources to students who have a friend or family member in crisis. You can also volunteer to become a Befriender listener.

  • Speaking of Suicide

    Started by a licensed psychotherapist, this in-depth blog openly talks about suicide and research on suicide. It also provides information for aspiring mental health counselors and educators.

  • Suicide Prevention Resource Center

    This comprehensive resource provides online tips and research that can be used to bolster suicide prevention efforts. It also features information on training events, webinars, and related news.

  • The Jason Foundation

    This group's mission is to cultivate prospective counselors and educators who specialize in youth crisis intervention and suicide prevention.

Resources for Students Who Have Lost Someone to Suicide


Reviewed by:

Megan Pietrucha, Psy.D., is a licensed clinical psychologist who currently practices in the Chicago area. She holds a bachelor's in psychology from Illinois Wesleyan University and a master's and doctorate in clinical psychology from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University. Her clinical interests include the treatment of eating and body image concerns, college student and student-athlete mental health, mood disorders, health and wellness, mindfulness, sport and performance psychology, and consultation. In addition to her clinical work, Dr. Pietrucha has served as the training director for an APA-accredited internship program and has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in psychology. She has also worked with high school and college athletes and teams, as well as recreational fitness programs, to provide mental skills training for athletic performance and fitness adherence. Megan Pietrucha is a paid member of the Red Ventures Education freelance review network.


Disclaimer: The above is intended as an information resource only. We are not a medical organization and cannot give medical advice. If you are experiencing a life-threatening situation, seek medical help or dial 911.


Feature Image: studiostockart / DigitalVision Vectors / Getty Images

Research indicates that more and more college students are thinking about suicide. Learn how to recognize the warning signs and get help. Learn the signs and symptoms of depression, anxiety, eating disorders and others — and find resources that lead to a happier and healthier college career. Some colleges offer more mental health services than others. Learn about important signs to look for when deciding on a school.

BestColleges.com is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site.

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