Nursing Salaries: How Much Does a Pediatric Nurse Make?

Many factors influence the exact earning potential of a nurse. Keep reading to discover more details about a pediatric nurse's salary.

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by Tessa Cooper

Published September 21, 2022

Reviewed by Shrilekha Deshaies, MSN, CCRN, RN

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Nursing Salaries: How Much Does a Pediatric Nurse Make?
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Pediatric nurses get the chance to make a positive impact on children's lives. Aside from the meaningful work, pediatric nurses may find their salary rewarding. So how much do pediatric nurses make? According to Payscale July 2022 data, registered pediatric nurses earn an average annual income of $94,230. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) states the median income for all other occupations measures $45,760. The average pediatric nurse salary is also higher than the median annual wage for all healthcare occupations of $75,040.

However, many factors influence the exact earning potential of a nurse. Keep reading to discover more details about a pediatric nurse's salary. This guide also highlights general advice on how higher education can play a role in landing a higher-paying job after college.

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Ready to start your journey?

What Is the Average Pediatric Nurse Salary?

People interested in nursing and pediatrics can pursue three basic career levels. These include vocational nurses, registered nurses, and nurse practitioners. The nursing salary varies for each of these levels. Knowing the median salaries below may help you in the salary negotiation process.

Highest-Paying Pediatric Nurse Jobs

Pediatric Nurse Job Average Annual Salary

Registered Pediatrics Nurse

$60,820 as of July 2022

Nurse Educator with Pediatrics Skills

$66,680 as of June 2022

Pediatrics Nurse Practitioner

$94,230 as of July 2022

Nurse-Midwives

$114,210 as of May 2021

Nurse Anesthetist with Pediatrics Skills

$163,870 as of March 2022

Data from the BLS and Payscale

How Much Do Pediatric Nurses Make in Your State?

Geographics play a role in salary in the nursing profession. Notice how in the chart below, states on the coasts often pay pediatric nurses more than states in the midwest. Several factors like living costs may contribute to the difference. Additionally, hospitals in states with a greater need for pediatric nurses sometimes offer competitive salaries.

Average Salary for Pediatric Nurses by State (YEAR)
State Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses Registered Nurses Nurse Practitioners

Alabama

$41,540

$61,920

$102,410

Alaska

$63,650

$97,230

$113,820

Arizona

$57,800

$81,600

$119,910

Arkansas

$43,040

$65,810

$107,080

California

$65,140

$124,000

$151,830

Colorado

$55,360

$80,670

$112,580

Connecticut

$59,440

$88,530

$120,450

Delaware

$53,040

$77,760

$116,230

District of Columbia

$57,250

$98,540

$125,290

Florida

$47,860

$72,000

$104,830

Georgia

$47,370

$75,380

$109,560

Hawaii

$53,320

$106,530

$127,490

Idaho

$49,440

$73,640

$105,290

Illinois

$54,080

$78,260

$120,470

Indiana

$51,500

$68,890

$113,490

Iowa

$48,010

$64,990

$121,370

Kansas

$46,550

$66,560

$108,710

Kentucky

$47,140

$67,260

$106,080

Louisiana

$43,900

$70,380

$112,650

Maine

$50,790

$73,630

$116,370

Maryland

$56,380

$82,660

$115,700

Massachusetts

$61,820

$96,630

$129,540

Michigan

$54,090

$75,930

$108,770

Minnesota

$51,160

$84,030

$127,010

Mississippi

$41,530

$63,130

$111,750

Missouri

$46,010

$67,790

$103,490

Montana

$48,300

$73,610

$115,710

Nebraska

$48,040

$69,850

$112,670

Nevada

$60,490

$88,800

$123,680

New Hampshire

$59,140

$78,270

$120,730

New Jersey

$58,590

$89,690

$137,010

New Mexico

$56,040

$77,590

$118,480

New York

$53,750

$93,320

$133,940

North Carolina

$49,210

$71,200

$112,730

North Dakota

$50,130

$71,200

$112,720

Ohio

$48,030

$71,640

$112,490

Oklahoma

$44,910

$68,180

$116,650

Oregon

$60,090

$98,630

$128,190

Pennsylvania

$51,090

$76,000

$117,260

Puerto Rico

$23,590

$35,690

$21,610

Rhode Island

$59,800

$85,270

$126,760

South Carolina

$46,470

$69,580

$102,850

South Dakota

$41,830

$60,540

$112,320

Tennessee

$43,620

$66,680

$95,120

Texas

$50,220

$79,120

$117,890

Utah

$50,740

$72,790

$112,920

Vermont

$54,180

$75,160

$112,540

Virginia

$48,430

$76,680

$112,320

Washington

$63,250

$95,350

$130,840

West Virginia

$41,310

$67,640

$104,750

Wisconsin

$49,850

$76,850

$116,990

Wyoming

$50,970

$73,130

$114,530

Data sourced from the BLS

The Highest-Paying States for Pediatric Nurses (by Median Salary, 2021)
Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses Registered Nurses Nurse Practitioners

California

Alaska

Washington

California

Hawaii

Oregon

California

New Jersey

New York

Data sourced from the BLS

Job Growth for Pediatric Nurses

Now may be an ideal time to major in nursing or switch to a pediatrics nursing career. The BLS projects the need for registered nurses to grow by 9% between 2020 and 2030. This compares to about as fast as average. However, the BLS projects the need for registered nurses to grow by 45% in the same period. The BLS cites a retiring workforce and people switching occupations as reasons for the growth.

What Field of Pediatric Nursing Pays the Most?

Pursuing a career as a nurse practitioner, anesthetist, or midwife may lead to the highest-paying opportunities. According to the BLS, the highest 10% of professionals in this field earn more than $200,540. These jobs require more education than a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN). In the next section, we highlight how education plays a role in getting a job with a high nursing salary.

Does More Education Lead to a Higher Pediatric Nurse Salary?

BSN Salary

A BSN in nursing takes about four years to finish. With a bachelor's degree in nursing, graduates often pursue jobs as registered nurses. According to April 2022 data from Payscale, professionals with a BSN in pediatrics nursing earn an average income of $94,000 per year. Learners who want to land a job as a pediatrics registered nurse may choose a corresponding concentration or minor.

Certified Nursing Assistant with Pediatrics Skills

Salary: $32,000

While pursuing a BSN, learners can work as certified nursing assistants (CNA). CNAs work alongside RNs to provide comfort and care to patients. They perform tasks like taking vitals and assisting patients with bathing and eating. Many CNAs become RNs after earning a BSN.

Registered Nurse

Salary: $77,600

These professionals coordinate patient care in various settings. They follow care plans that doctors create and oversee assistant nurses. They administer medications and ensure patients remain comfortable under their care experience. Registered nurses often work in clinics and hospitals.

Pediatrics Nurse

Salary: $60,820

These professionals assist pediatricians and perform similar tasks as registered nurses. However, they provide care to children and adolescents instead of working with adults. They also communicate with the child's parents. These nurses must possess patience and compassion for young children.

MSN Salary

An MSN takes about two years to finish. Learners gain an even deeper understanding of the nursing profession. Most MSN programs highlight pharmacology and decision-making processes. According to July 2022 data from Payscale, an MSN may prepare learners for even higher-paying jobs. This data shows professionals with an MSN in pediatrics nursing earn an average income of $96,000.

Pediatrics Nurse Practitioner

Salary:$94,230

These nurse practitioners see patients as old as 21. They know of the growth and development patterns of children. They may make recommendations on preventative care like vaccines. Pediatric nurse practitioners can write prescriptions under the supervision of a doctor in most states.

Postsecondary Nursing Instructor

Salary: $82,040

These professionals equip the next generation of nurses with the necessary skills and knowledge. Often, postsecondary nurses have experience working in a clinic or hospital. Some schools allow nursing instructors to focus on one subject, like pediatrics.

Family Nurse Practitioner

Salary: $98,370

Family nurse practitioners provide care to people of many ages. They receive more autonomy than registered nurses but less than doctors. They can prescribe medications and perform physical exams. Most states require nurse practitioners to practice under a supervising physician.

Frequently Asked Questions About Pediatric Nurse Salaries

How many years does it take to become a pediatric nurse? true

The length of time varies on career goals. CNAs typically only need a certificate or diploma to practice. This often takes less than a year to finish. RNs need at least a BSN, which takes about four years. Nurse practitioners need to commit to at least two more years of education to earn an MSN.

Learners who want to finish their degrees faster can pursue an accelerated program and enroll full time. However, students who want to work during their studies may attend part time and participate in a self-paced program. It may take some learners longer to pass the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses exam.

Is pediatric nursing competitive? true

Pediatric nurses may be more in demand in some regions than others. Many people feel drawn to the pediatrics profession. Areas with fewer openings may feature more competitive applicant pools. However, the BLS projects a positive growth outlook for nurses. The organization projects about 194,500 new openings each year for RNs from 2020-2030.

Learners can take steps to position themselves as competitive job candidates. They can shadow pediatric nurses and request to complete their rotations at pediatric clinics. Filling a resume with related pediatric experience may increase a person's chances of entering the pediatrics profession.

What is the difference between a pediatric nurse and a pediatrician? true

Pediatricians are medical doctors that create treatment plans. They can order diagnostic tests and prescribe medications. Pediatric nurses typically assist pediatricians. They carry out the treatment plans for pediatricians. They may also administer medications and record notes for a doctor. Both of these professionals work together to help a child achieve the best health possible.

Becoming a pediatrician requires more education. These doctors spend about 12 years in school. Pediatric nurses usually only spend about four years on their education. A pediatric nurse practitioner typically spends six years working on their degree.

What is the highest salary for a pediatric nurse? true

Pediatric nurses who want to earn the most money should pursue a career as a nurse practitioner. These professionals earn varying amounts depending on where they work. According to the BLS, these nurses who work in hospitals and outpatient care facilities earn the most.

Nurse practitioners in different states receive different incomes. For example, California nurse practitioners earned a mean wage of $151,830 in May 2021. At the same time, Floridian nurse practitioners only earned $104,830.

BestColleges.com is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site.

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