When Is Ivy Day 2022?

Each spring, the Ivy League schools release their admission decisions on Ivy Day. Discover what Ivy Day entails, and get tips on what to do after.

portrait of Hannah Muniz
by Hannah Muniz

Updated March 25, 2022

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When Is Ivy Day 2022?


If you've applied to one or more Ivy League schools, you may be anxious to receive your admission decision. After all, the Ivies are some of the most competitive schools in the country.

But did you know that in addition to being highly selective and competing in college sports together, all eight Ivy League institutions release their admission decisions on the same day? This day, known as Ivy Day, varies slightly each year but usually takes place in late March or early April.

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Ready to start your journey?

Keep reading to learn more about what Ivy Day entails and when it is for 2022.

What Is Ivy Day?

Ivy Day is the day each spring when all eight Ivy League schools — Brown University, Columbia University, Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Harvard University, Princeton University, the University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University — release their admission decisions for first-year students starting that fall.

This year's Ivy Day will take place Thursday, March 31, at 7 p.m. Eastern time, according to Harvard.

Only those who applied regular decision, rather than early action or early decision, to at least one Ivy League institution should expect to receive an admission decision on Ivy Day. If you applied early, you should have already received a decision around December.

The Ivy League schools release their admission decisions online at the same exact time, normally 5 p.m. or 7 p.m. Eastern time.

Ivy Day, 2018-2022
Year Date Time
2022 Thursday, March 31 7 p.m. ET
2021 Tuesday, April 6 7 p.m. ET
2020 Thursday, March 26 7 p.m. ET
2019 Thursday, March 28 5 p.m. ET
2018 Wednesday, March 28 7 p.m. ET

What Should You Do After Ivy Day?

Once you've gotten your Ivy admission decision, what should you do next? Consider the following depending on whether you were accepted, rejected, or waitlisted.

If You Were Accepted

Students who received an acceptance to one or more Ivy League schools should start preparing for College Decision Day on May 1. This means taking time to compare the schools you got accepted to and begin thinking about financial aid award letters and what you and your family can afford.

If You Were Rejected

Rejection isn't fun — there's no getting around that. If you got rejected from one or more Ivies, take time to process your feelings. It's OK to feel bummed, angry, and disappointed.

Still, give yourself credit for trying — you would have never even had a chance of getting in if you hadn't applied! It's also important to remind yourself that the vast majority of applicants to Ivy League schools do not get accepted. This includes students with perfect SAT/ACT scores and impressive resumes.

Once you've had time to process the rejection(s), start thinking about the schools you did get accepted to. It can help to make a list comparing the pros and cons of each college.

If you're stuck deciding between two or more schools, consider taking next steps like visiting campuses, contacting professors, and speaking with alumni about their experiences.

If You Were Waitlisted

Rarely, Ivy League applicants may get waitlisted. This means you were neither accepted nor rejected; instead, you've been listed as a backup should the school have room to accept more candidates.

You're not required to accept a place on the waitlist. Doing this often means waiting around for several months and, in the meantime, having to put down a nonrefundable deposit to enroll in a different school.

But if you're still strongly interested in attending this Ivy, consider accepting a spot on the waitlist.

You can try to raise your chances of getting accepted off the waitlist by writing a letter of intent (if you're allowed to submit one). This letter should present a strong case as to why the admissions committee should admit you. View it as an opportunity to demonstrate your passion for the school.


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BestColleges.com is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site.

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