Bachelor’s in Radiology Technology Program Guide

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by Staff Writers

Updated August 31, 2022

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Radiology uses medical imaging to diagnose, treat, and monitor various diseases. Medical imaging includes x-rays, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), providing a variety of specialization options for potential radiologists.

Radiology professionals are often the first to correctly diagnose patients and handle vastly different caseloads each day. If you enjoy solving puzzles that include the use of technology to help people in meaningful ways every day, you may want to consider earning a bachelor of science in radiology technology.

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The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that jobs for radiologic and MRI technologists will increase by 9% through 2028.

As technology continues to develop, radiologists' ability to uncover medical solutions to diseases increases. Additionally, technology development creates a higher demand for professionals with cutting-edge knowledge and skills. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that jobs for radiologic and MRI technologists will increase by 9% through 2028.

Should I Get a Bachelor's in Radiology Technology?

One of the most crucial decisions to make when embarking on a radiology tech degree is whether to enroll in an on-campus or online program.

Students graduating from high school may find that attending school on campus provides them with access to a network of like-minded, emerging professionals in their field. Also, in-person courses are similar to secondary classroom environments, which can make transitioning into college life much easier. Attending school on campus also provides access to many resources such as writing labs, clubs, local internship opportunities, tutors, and labs.

On the other hand, working professionals transitioning into a new field or continuing their education may online programs for their flexibility. Many online programs offer asynchronous coursework, wherein students complete coursework whenever they have time as long as it is before the submission dates. Asynchronous learning also allows students to engage with classmates and professors through group work, discussion boards, and email.

Students with hectic schedules could also enroll in self-paced online programs that allow them to complete work when they have the time. Though self-paced programs lack deadlines, students should keep in mind that there is no interaction with classmates or professors either.

In addition to the technology component, a career in radiology involves human interaction and collaboration with medical professionals outside of the radiology field. Candidates should have leadership abilities, superb organizational skills, and good communication skills. Coursework develops knowledge regarding bedside manner, safety, and operating complex machines. Students also master calculating and combining chemicals for imaging.

What Can I Do With a Bachelor's in Radiology Technology?

A radiology degree creates numerous career opportunities because it deals with patients of all ages. Students with an affinity for working with children might specialize in pediatric radiography or become an ultrasound technician. Sonography can also be used to diagnose illnesses in adults. On the other hand, some professionals prefer to work with large machines like MRI machines or CT scanners that can help physicians identify what is troubling a patient in order to properly diagnose them. Students should consider what technology, body parts, or populations they enjoy working with to identify their ideal career.

BestColleges.com is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site.

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