Bachelor’s in Journalism Program Guide

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August 19, 2021

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Journalism is different today than 10 years ago thanks to the internet. Traditionally, journalism students study fact-checking and learn interviewing and research techniques. A bachelor's degree in journalism prepares students as writers and teaches them to master the technology they need for success in this ever-changing industry.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that employment for reporters, correspondents, and broadcast news analysts could decline by 11% between 2019 and 2029. However, a bachelor's degree in journalism can open doors for careers in communications, politics, sports, and entertainment. In addition, the BLS projects 7% job growth for technical writers between 2019 and 2029.

Some journalism programs focus on broadcast journalism and digital technologies, while others concentrate on investigative reporting. Students can also opt for an online bachelor's degree in journalism that offers flexibility and practical experience with industry technology.

Should I Get a Bachelor's in Journalism?

Journalists are passionate and committed to the truth. Unbiased reporting and fact-checking are vital because of the abundance of misinformation online. A bachelor's degree in journalism suits students who believe in the free press, want to share people's stories, and seek to reveal corruption through research and fact-checking.

A bachelor's degree in journalism suits students who believe in the free press, want to share people's stories, and seek to reveal corruption through research and fact-checking.

Graduates develop skills in interviewing, writing, and editing. Students who pursue a degree in broadcast journalism learn technical production skills, including filming and editing footage. For working professionals and nontraditional students, there are also opportunities for flexible scheduling with an online bachelor's degree in journalism.

On-campus programs offer opportunities for students to network with peers and professors. However, online students can also make connections through chat, live online lectures, and video discussions. An internship or on-the-job training may provide opportunities to connect with industry professionals.

Graduates can also pursue certifications and continuing education opportunities to advance their careers.

Find the best online bachelor's in journalism programs.

What Will I Learn in a Journalism Bachelor's Program?

Whether students choose an online bachelor's degree in journalism or study on campus, they develop research, interviewing, and storytelling skills. Graduates learn to tell stories in various formats, including internet news, broadcast news, magazines, blogs, radio, and podcasts. Learners pursuing a bachelor's degree in journalism may also study data analytics and digital media communications.

Learners explore the format for writing news stories and study AP style. Depending on the program, students may pursue internships and gain practical work experience.

Journalists talk to sources, review case files, and seek evidence that leads to the truth. As such, graduates learn to keep personal opinions out of their stories and strive to report only accurate information. Likewise, since some professional journalists produce multiple pieces per day, students must develop excellent time management skills.

Concentrations

Magazine Journalism
This concentration helps students research, report, and write longer feature stories. Learners build the skills and values of journalism, including accurate reporting, clear and concise writing, and compelling storytelling. Additionally, students gain field experience to hone their expertise.
News and Features
News and features students learn how to write ethical and accurate news and human-interest stories. Learners report on business, urban affairs, the environment, and other newsworthy topics, developing a portfolio of work that showcases their ability to use digital media to report the news.
Sports and Media
This concentration prepares students to work in traditional and new media platforms. Coursework focuses on journalism, with a specialized sports core curriculum. Courses include studies in multimedia sports reporting, sports media law, and sports communication.
Broadcast and Digital Journalism
This concentration helps students develop the skills needed to work in the free press. Coursework typically focuses on practical learning in which students produce live newscasts in a digital studio. Students also learn to accurately and ethically report the news.
Convergent Media
This concentration typically combines traditional journalism, broadcasting, audio/video production, and web design to help students become successful media professionals. Learners gain experience in digital media to prepare for the job market.

Still Looking for the Right Fit? Discover Similar Programs

What Can I Do With a Bachelor's in Journalism?

Graduates with a bachelor's degree in journalism can find entry-level work as journalists and reporters. They can also pursue careers as correspondents who research and report the news through television, radio, podcasts, and newspapers.

Graduates may also be able to pursue careers as editors who ensure final projects are grammatically and structurally sound. Editors make decisions about publishing articles and stories and approve final story versions.

Additionally, depending on their concentration, graduates may also find opportunities as technical writers, authors, public relations managers, and film and video editors.

Popular Career Paths

Popular Continuing Education Paths

How Much Money Can I Make With a Bachelor's in Journalism?

According to PayScale, the average annual salary for graduates with a bachelor's degree in journalism is $61,140. Reporters and correspondents are on the low end of the salary scale at around $49,300 per year, while jobs in marketing and communications pay approximately $53,000-$88,000 annually.

Frequently Asked Questions About Bachelor's in Journalism Programs

What is journalism? true

Journalism is the process of gathering and assessing information to create accurate and unbiased newsworthy stories. Journalism is characterized by strong writing and a passionate pursuit of the truth.

How much does it cost to get a bachelor's in journalism? true

The cost of a bachelor's degree in journalism depends on school type, delivery method, and residency status. In general, in-state students in online programs at public universities pay the lowest tuition rates. Most programs charge $300-$500 per credit.

Is a bachelor's in journalism worth it? true

The skills students develop with a bachelor's degree in journalism can transfer to industries like marketing and communications. Graduates can also pursue careers as technical writers, for whom the BLS projects 7% job growth between 2019 and 2029.

Are journalists in high demand?

Jobs for journalists are declining. However, although journalists may not be in high demand, graduates can apply their journalism skills to other in-demand writing, editing, and communications jobs.

How long does it take to get a bachelor's in journalism?

Most full-time students can complete a bachelor's degree in journalism in four years, with some programs offering accelerated tracks. Part-time students usually need longer to graduate.

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