Associate in Computer Science Program Guide

April 14, 2021

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Computer science graduates write the programs that power our modern world, from the programs that run our cars to the apps on our mobile phones. They design websites, code online banking applications, and create video games. One computer science graduate, Mark Zuckerberg, created Facebook and became one of the world's richest people.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), computer and information technology professionals earned a median annual salary of $91,250 in 2020. Computer science requires strong math, logic, and problem-solving skills. Learners who enjoy solving challenging problems may excel in a computer science career.

Should I Get an Associate in Computer Science?

An associate degree takes just two years to complete, which means you can enter the workforce sooner.

An associate degree in computer science is the first step for those who want to pursue careers as computer programmers, web developers, and computer support specialists. This degree can serve as a launch pad for those who want to continue their education at the bachelor's level or beyond.

An onsite or online associate degree in computer science typically takes just two years to complete, which means you can enter the workforce sooner. Students can often continue to work full time while working toward their degree.

Although the BLS projects jobs for computer programmers to decline between 2019 and 2029, jobs for web developers and computer support specialists are projected to grow. Computer programmers can earn certifications to showcase their skills and make themselves more employable. Some of the most sought-after certifications include Microsoft certifications and the certified secure software lifecycle professional credential.

Check out the Best Online Associate in Computer Science Programs

What Will I Learn in a Computer Science Associate Program?

Most associate programs in computer science teach students to use object-oriented programming to solve problems, communicate effectively, and develop and use mathematical algorithms. Enrollees usually learn 2-3 different programming languages. They may learn web programming as well as general purpose programming.

Computer languages taught vary from one school to another and may include C++, Java, JavaScript, or Visual Basic. Students take courses like software engineering, web development, and object-oriented programming. In addition to programming courses, the curriculum often includes advanced math classes in calculus and discrete mathematics.

Some colleges offer an associate of science (AS) in computer science and others offer an associate of applied science (AAS). The main difference between the two degrees is that an AS prepares students to transfer to a four-year college, while an AAS prepares them to immediately enter the workforce.

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What Can I Do With an Associate in Computer Science?

Companies in nearly every industry hire computer programmers, web developers, and computer support specialists. Computer science graduates can work in many diverse industries, including the automotive, finance, and fashion industries. Computer science degree-holders can usually find a job that suits their specific interests and strengths.

Computer science graduates with an associate degree may qualify to work as computer support specialists, web developers, and computer programmers. Other computer science careers, such as software developer, information security analyst, and database administrator, typically require a bachelor's degree.

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How Much Money Can I Make With an Associate in Computer Science?

Salaries for computer science degree-holders vary widely. For example, computer support specialists earned an annual median salary of $55,510 in 2020, while computer programmers earned $89,190. Additionally, web developers earned a median annual salary of $77,200 in 2020, while network and computer systems administrators earned $84,810.

Keep in mind that many professionals in these positions possess a bachelor's degree and may earn higher wages as a result.

Frequently Asked Questions About Associate in Computer Science Programs

What is computer science?

Computer science is the study of computers and software. Computer science graduates deal mostly with software and programming rather than computer hardware.

What kind of jobs can I get with an associate in computer science?

Graduates with an associate degree in computer science can work as computer support specialists, web developers, and computer programmers. Job candidates can improve their prospects by earning a bachelor's degree.

Is an associate in computer science worth it?

Many professionals with a computer science degree earn above-average salaries. Prospective students should consider their career aspirations when deciding whether to pursue an associate in computer science. In 2018, an associate degree at a public school cost an average of $7,140.

Are computer science jobs in demand?

The BLS projects an increasing demand for most computer science professionals, such as web developers and computer support specialists, between 2019 and 2029. However, the demand for computer programmers is in decline due to companies hiring workers from overseas.

Is computer science hard?

Learners with strong math and problem-solving skills usually excel in computer science. Computer science graduates must be able to use mathematical algorithms to solve complex problems.

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